For some, the transnational values of K-pop are responsible for its success.A commentator at the University of California has said that "contemporary Korean pop culture is built on [...] transnational flows [...] taking place across, beyond, and outside national and institutional boundaries." Some examples of the transnational values inherent in K-pop that may appeal to those from different ethnic, national, and religious backgrounds include a dedication to high-quality output and presentation of idols, as well as their work ethic and polite social demeanour, made possible by the training period. which consists of members Kyuhyun, Ryeowook, and Yesung, and Super Junior-M, which became one of the best-selling K-pop subgroups in China.

After a slump in early K-pop, from 2003 TVXQ and Bo A started a new generation of K-pop idols that broke the music genre into the neighboring Japanese market and continue to popularize K-pop internationally today.

With the advent of online social networking services and Korean TV shows, the current global spread of K-pop and Korean entertainment, known as the Korean Wave, is seen not only in East and Southeast Asia but also Latin America, Management agencies in South Korea offer binding contracts to potential artists, sometimes at a young age.

This allows songs and artists to be marketed to a wider audience around the world.

An example of a Korean song with a large proportion of English lyrics is Kara’s "Jumping," which was released at the same time in both Korea and Japan to much success.

To choreograph a dance for a song requires the writers to take the tempo into account.

The South Korean government has acknowledged benefits to the country's export sector as a result of the Korean Wave (it was estimated in 2011 that a US0 increase in the export of cultural products resulted in a US2 increase in exports of other consumer goods including food, clothes, cosmetics and IT products Government initiatives to expand the popularity of K-pop are mostly undertaken by the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism, which is responsible for the worldwide establishment of Korean Cultural Centers.

Trainees live together in a regulated environment and spend many hours a day learning music, dance, foreign languages and other skills in preparation for their debut.

This "robotic" system of training is often criticized by Western media outlets.

Groups are given a name and a "concept", along with a marketing hook. Prior to the actual video, the group releases teaser photos and trailers.

Sometimes sub-units or sub-groups are formed among existing members. Promotional cycles of subsequent singles are called comebacks even when the musician or group in question did not go on hiatus.

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