1180 Lavabo - The first word of that portion of Psalm 25 said by the celebrant at Mass while he washes his hands after the Offertory, from which word the whole ceremony is named La Valette, Jean Parisot de - Forty-eighth Grand Master of the Order of the Knights of St. of Law) Law, Mosaic - The body of juridical, moral, and ceremonial institutions, laws, and decisions comprised in the last four books of the Pentateuch, and ascribed by Christian and Hebrew tradition to Moses Law, Natural - In English this term is frequently employed as equivalent to the laws of nature, meaning the order which governs the activities of the material universe. He died in 1456 Lawrence of Brindisi, Saint - An Italian Capuchin with a talent for languages, much in demand as a preacher, was chaplain of the Imperial army. He died in 1619 Lawrence O'Toole, Saint - Confessor, abbot, and the first Irish-born bishop of Dublin, d.

Among the Roman jurists natural law designated those instincts and emotions common to man and the lower animals, such as the instinct of self-preservation and love of offspring Law, Roman - This subject is briefly treated under the two heads of; I. 1180 Laws, Penal - Treats of the penal legislation affecting Catholics in English-speaking countries since the Reformation.

C., and gave it the name of his wife, Laodice Laplace, Pierre-Simon - Mathematician and astronomer (1749-1827) Lapsi - The regular designation in the third century for Christians who relapsed into heathenism, especially for those who during the persecutions displayed weakness in the face of torture, and denied the Faith by sacrificing to the heathen gods or by any other acts Last Judgment, The - To it the prophets of the Old Testament refer when they speak of the 'Day of the Lord' (Joel 3:4; Ezekiel 13:5; Isaiah ), in which the nations will be summoned to judgment.

In the New Testament the second Parusia, or coming of Christ as Judge of the world, is an oft-repeated doctrine Last Supper, The - The Evangelists and critics generally agree that the Last Supper was on a Thursday, that Christ suffered and died on Friday, and that He arose from the dead on Sunday Lateran, Saint John - This is the oldest, and ranks first among the four great 'patriarchal' basilicas of Rome Lateran Council, First - It put a stop to the arbitrary conferring of ecclesiastical benefices by laymen, reestablished freedom of episcopal and abbatial elections, separated spiritual from temporal affairs, and ratified the principle that spiritual authority can emanate only from the Church; lastly it tacitly abolished the exorbitant claim of the emperors to interfere in papal elections Lateran Council, Second - To efface the last vestiges of the schism, to condemn various errors and reform abuses among clergy and people Innocent, in the month of April, 1139, convoked, at the Lateran, the tenth ecumenical council Lateran Council, Third - In September, 1178, the pope in agreement with an article of the Peace of Venice, convoked an ecumenical council at the Lateran for Lent of the following year and, with that object, sent legates to different countries Lateran Council, Fourth - From the commencement of his reign Innocent III had purposed to assemble an ecumenical council, but only towards the end of his pontificate could he realize this project, by the Bull of 19 April, 1213.

The assembly was to take place in November, 1215 Lateran Council, Fifth - Convoked, by the Bull of 18 July, 1511, to assemble 19 April, 1512, in the church of St.

John Lateran Latin, Ecclesiastical - The Latin in the official textbooks of the Church (the Bible and the Liturgy), as well as in the works of those Christian writers of the West who have undertaken to expound or defend Christian beliefs Latin Church - The Latin Church is simply that vast portion of the Catholic body which obeys the Latin patriarch, which submits to the pope, not only in papal, but also in patriarchal matters Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem - Founded as a result of the First Crusade, in 1099.

No certainty either as to when he was elected or as to exactly how long he reigned Leo VI, Pope - The exact dates of the election and death of Leo VI are uncertain, but it is clear that he was pope during the latter half of 928 Leo VII, Pope - Date of birth unknown; d. between 20 February and 13 April, 965 Leo IX, Pope - Hagiographical article on this reformer pope, who died in 1054 Leo X, Pope - Reigned 1513-1521 Leo XI, Pope - Reigned 1605 Leo XII, Pope - Born at the Castello della Genga in the territory of Spoleto, 22 August, 1760; died in Rome, 10 February, 1829 Leo XIII, Pope - Lengthy biographical article on the author of 'Rerum novarum.' Leonard of Limousin, Saint - According to eleventh-century legend, he was a sixth-century Frankish nobleman Leonardo da Vinci - Florentine painter, sculptor, architect, engineer and scholar (1452-1519) Lepanto - Italian name for Naupactos (Naupactus) a titular metropolitan see of ancient Epirus Leprosy - A chronic infectious disease characterized by the formation of growths in the skin, mucous membranes, peripheral nerves, bones, and internal viscera, producing various deformities and mutilations of the human body, and usually terminating in death Le Puy - Diocese in France Lesbi - A titular see in Mauretania Sitifensis, suffragan of Sitifis, or Setif, in Algeria Lesbi - A titular see in Mauretania Sitifensis, suffragan of Sitifis, or Setif, in Algeria Levites - The subordinate ministers appointed in the Mosaic Law for the service of the Tabernacle and of the Temple Leviticus - The third book of the Pentateuch, so called because it treats of the offices, ministries, rites, and ceremonies of the priests and Levites Libel - A malicious publication by writing, printing, picture, effigy, sign, or otherwise than by mere speech, which exposes any living person, or the memory of any person deceased, to hatred, contempt, ridicule, or obloquy, or which causes or tends to cause any person to be ashamed or avoided, or which has a tendency to injure any person, corporation, or association of persons, in his, her, or its business or occupation Liber Pontificalis - A history of the popes beginning with St.

Peter and continued down to the fifteenth century, in the form of biographies Liberal Arts, The Seven - Chiefly used during the Middle Ages.Francis of Assissi - Little Flowers of Francis of Assisi, the name given to a classic collection of popular legends about the life of St.Francis of Assisi and his early companions as they appeared to the Italian people at the beginning of the fourteenth century Little Office of Our Lady - Historical article on the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, modeled on the Divine Office Liturgical Books - All the books, published by the authority of any church, that contain the text and directions for her official (liturgical) services Liturgical Chant - A chant, if its style, composition, and execution prove it suitable for liturgical use, may properly be called liturgical chant Liturgy - A Greek composite word meaning originally a public duty, a service to the state undertaken by a citizen Liturgy of the Hours - Brief essay on the historical development of the Liturgy of the Hours Liverpool - One of the thirteen dioceses into which Pius IX divided Catholic England, 29 September, 1850, when he re-established the Catholic hierarchy Loaves of Proposition - Heb. 'bread of the presence (of Yahweh)' (Ex., xxxv, 13; xxxix, 35, etc.), also called 'holy bread' Logic - A historical survey from Indian and Pre-Aristotelian philosophy to the Logic of John Stuart Mill Logos, The - The word Logos is the term by which Christian theology in the Greek language designates the Word of God, or Second Person of the Blessed Trinity Lollards - The name given to the followers of John Wyclif, an heretical body numerous in England in the latter part of the fourteenth and the first half of the fifteenth century Lombard, Peter - Biobibliographical essay on the Master of the Sentences Lombardy - A word derived from Longobardia and used during the Middle Ages to designate the country ruled over by the Longobards, which varied in extent with the varying fortunes of that race in Italy London (England) - The capital of England and chief city of the British Empire, is situated about fifty miles from the mouth of the Thames Longstreet, James - Soldier and Catholic convert.Lay Brothers - Religious occupied solely with manual labour and with the secular affairs of a monastery or friary Lazarites - A congregation of secular priests with religious vows founded by St.Vincent de Paul Lazarus - The name of two persons in the N.The remainder of the Acts are known only through a Syriac translation by a Monophysite monk, published from the British Museum MS. 14,530, written in the year 535 Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of - Also called the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.